Jesus is not an angel, nor a special angelic messenger of God


The apostate and pagan doctrines distort the divinity of Jesus by making him look like a spiritual being of the same rank as an angel, denying that Jesus is God himself; such a postulate is heretical and is not part of the doctrine of Christ.

The writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews states bluntly that Jesus is not an angel, nor any other angelic creature, but God himself. To explain it, the writer asks two questions. The first question is,

For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? … Hebrews 1:5a

And the second question,

… And again, [unto which of the angels said he] I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?      Hebrews 1:5b

The apostle poses the questions in such a way that who reads them understands that at no time has God given such designation to any angel. However, the apostle answer each questions by reviewing specific texts of the Law and the Psalms that declare that only once has God given such designation, and has it been to the Son.

The first reference that the apostle makes of the Son is found in verse 5,

For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

The response of the apostle makes reference to two texts of the Old Testament, one of the Psalms, in Psalm 2: 7, …

I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee.

… And the other reference, from the second book of Samuel, chapter 7, verse 14,

I will be his father, and he shall be my son. If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with the stripes of the children of men:

According to both texts, according to the writer, in none of them such designation of the Lord was declared to an angel, but only to the offspring of David, that is, to the Christ.

In verse 6 of the same chapter of the epistle to the Hebrews, the apostle again states categorically that Jesus is not an angel,

And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.

Reference taken from Deuteronomy 32:43. It does not appear the same in most English versions because the writer’s reference follows the version of the Septuagint. The New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE), translates the text in the following way,

Exult with him, you heavens, bow to him, all you divine beings!

The text states that the Son (Jesus) is God, before whom the angels prostrate themselves.

Then, in verses 8 and 9, the apostle forewarns that the words that have been declared to the Son have never been given to any of the angels,

But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a scepter of righteousness is the scepter of thy kingdom. 9Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.

The apostle takes on this occasion the text of Psalm 45: 6, 7:

Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: the scepter of thy kingdom is a right scepter. 7Thou lovest righteousness, and hatest wickedness: therefore God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.

Notice how the psalmist addresses God highlighting the greatness of His Kingdom, but a few lines below says, “God hath anointed thee,” as if it were a man. The apostle states that the psalm of David is a prophecy about the Son, Jesus, chosen by God the Father, who is far above the angels.

The other texts that the apostle quotes to prove that Jesus is not an angel are found in verses 10 through 12:

And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands: 11They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; 12And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.                                              Hebrews 1:10-12

The text to which the apostle refers is found in Psalm 102: 25-27,

Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens are the work of thy hands. 26They shall perish, but thou shalt endure: yea, all of them shall wax old like a garment; as a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed: 27But thou art the same, and thy years shall have no end.

In the Psalm what it seems are David’s words to God highlighting his Presence in Jerusalem, in reality they are prophetic words to the “son of David” who is to reign the earth from Jerusalem, “When the people are gathered together, and the kingdoms, to serve the LORD“. The Son of David is the Messiah (The Christ, in Greek).

He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David: Luke 1:32

The conclusion of the psalm highlights the Lordship of Christ over his people.

The children of thy servants shall continue, and their seed shall be established before thee.

In his mission to show that Jesus is not an angel but God himself, the writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews quotes the texts of the Law and the Psalms, and shows how God-Father has decreed that the Son is the heir of everything, and that such a decree has never been addressed to any angel.

In the conclusion, in verse 7, the writer presents the only time God-Father has addressed to define the angels, and the terms under which he defined them.

And of the angels he saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of fire.

This reference is taken from Psalm 104:4,

Who maketh his angels spirits; his ministers a flaming fire:

Then, in verses 13 and 14 of chapter one of Hebrews, the apostle again emphasizes that angels are spirits, and that they are at the service of the heirs of salvation.

But to which of the angels said he at any time, Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool? 14Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?

Definitely, Jesus is not an angel, He is God himself manifested according to the time established for the redemption and salvation of humanity that recognizes Him and submits to his Lordship.